Tag Archives: Music

landfillharmonic

In the barrios of Paraguay, music arises from the garbage heaps and children find new dreams

The Inter-American Developmant Bank’s Water and Sanitation Division, the Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF), and the Cultural Center of the Office of External Relations proudly present the Orquesta De Instrumentos Reciclados (Orchestra of Recycled Instruments) of Cateura, Paraguay in their D.C. debut on August 27, 2013.

“The world sends us their garbage, we give them back music”

The Orchestra of Recycled Instruments is a mind-boggling creative effort. An innovative 18 member group of young musicians from Paraguay, the orchestra uses musical instruments made with recycled materials, resulting in a seamless combination of culture and social innovation.

Favio Chávez, the Orchestra’s visionary Director, used his ingenuity to put a team together to search the landfill for usable materials and craft musical instruments out of discarded materials. In Cateura, a village that grew around a landfill, children are often at risk of getting involved with drugs and gangs, but the Orchestra of Recycled Instruments has offered these young people new life opportunities through music.

In just a few years, their program has led to a thriving music school and a youth orchestra that performs internationally. The Orchestra is also the subject of a documentary, Landfill Harmonic, which is slated to be released in 2014.

http://www.landfillharmonicmovie.com/

Excerpt of Article from Inter-American Development Bank Website


4’33”

Up and down the main street through downtown Santa Cruz there are similarly odd and intriguing performances of compositions by musical pioneer John Cage . It’s part of a celebration in honor of Cage’s 100th birthday (Cage died in 1992).
Cage studied classical music and later experimented with radically altering the landscape of musical possibilities. He’s inspired musicians across many genres, from new age to ambient and contemporary classical; avant-garde to noise and punk rock. Cage is perhaps best known for his experiments with silence and using techniques of randomness for composing music. He was deeply influenced by Zen Buddhism.
Perhaps his most famous composition, 4’33’’, is performed by musicians who sit with their instruments and don’t play a single note, for four minutes and thirty-three seconds. The piece was partly inspired by Cage’s visit to a soundproof room. He was surprised when he heard two sounds inside the silence (…and it wasn’t Simon and Garfunkel). A sound engineer told Cage the high-pitched sound was his nervous system and the low sound was his blood flowing.
In meditative practices of Buddhism and Hinduism, these sounds are sometimes referred to as “nada.” I’ve heard Vipassana teachers and Buddhist monastics talk about these “sounds within silence,” which can be concentrated upon to bring deeper focus and calm. Baba Hari Dass, a Hindu guru who has maintained a vow of silence since 1952, once wrote: “The inner sound, nada, can be that of a flute, bells, sitar…”
John Cage’s experiments with sound, silence, and music remind me of some musical—and spiritual—ideals to live by:

  • Music can come from anywhere: crickets, ocean waves, a cactus, a human heartbeat. We just have to remember to listen.
  • Keep opening to the possibility of hearing and making new music.
  • Listening to sounds without judgment is a great practice for increasing our capacity to listen to ideas and beliefs of others without moral judgment.
  • We each have the freedom to decide where we draw the line between music and not music (if we draw that line at all).

Excerpt of Article Sound, Silence and John Cage: Four Musical and Spiritual Ideals to Live By By John Malkin